How to treat glandular fever

Glandular fever is a contagious illness which is frequent in teens and young adults.

Glandular fever is a contagious illness which is frequent in teens and young adults.

Glandular fever is a contagious illness which is frequent in teens and young adults.

Generally, the virus is spread through saliva and from individual to individual through:

  • Kissing
  • Sneezing and coughing, which transmit the virus in airborne droplets
  • Drinking and eating utensils like glasses, cups and eating utensils.

Symptoms of glandular fever

Many individuals are exposed to the illness but never get any symptoms. This is particularly true in kids.

For those who do get glandular fever, it generally begins like most throat infections with:

  • A high fever
  • Inflamed glands, generally in the neck
  • Painful throat
  • Exhaustion and fatigue.

Though the key distinction is the timeframe – while most individuals get over a sore throat in a couple days, glandular fever makes most individuals feel ill for up to three weeks, while the fatigue and inflamed glands might last up to three months, or maybe longer.

Treatment

  • There is no precise management for glandular fever. It is a viral illness, so antibiotics wont work.
  • The key treatment is to get lots of rest, take care of yourself and drink lots of liquids.
  • Kids below the age of 16 years should not consume aspirin, because it might cause a severe disorder known as Reye’s syndrome.

Prevention

As with other contagious illnesses, the spread of the glandular fever can be condensed. Individuals who have glandular fever should:

  • Cautiously clean their hands with soap and water, particularly after coughing and sneezing, and before touching other individuals
  • Avoid sharing utensils with other people
  • Avoid kissing individuals who have, or might have glandular fever

Because they are contagious, individuals with glandular fever should avoid school or work, and should stay at home until they get better. Chat to your GP about when it is suitable to go back to normal life.

Related video 

FACT CHECK

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/167390.php

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/glandular-fever/

https://www.nhsinform.scot/illnesses-and-conditions/infections-and-poisoning/glandular-fever

Was this post helpful?

Tags:

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Please solve captcha * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.